Steven Knudson quoted in article regarding “6 Ways to Test Your Financial Literacy Today”

Written by: Stephanie Taylor Christensen

Improving your personal finance know-how is a goal worth aspiring to, but with so much to learn, how do you know where you stand when it comes to financial literacy?

Here are six aspects of money management to test your own financial literacy:

Budget basics

While there are plenty of online and mobile app tools that ease the burden of budgeting, your dedication to managing spending, eliminating debt, and saving as much as you can is key. The longer and more consistently you budget, you’ll begin to identify and plan for those red flag financial events like car repairs, vacation expenses, gifts, and medical bills so you don’t have to turn to using high-interest credit cards.

If you have debts, your budgeting plan should also include eliminating them, systemically, based on the interest rate on each loan. (Hint: Pay down the one that costs you the most, first).

Pre “financial crisis,” budgeting was about not overspending. In light of renewed focus on the risks of living paycheck to paycheck, the advice has shifted not to living within your means, but well under them.

In her book “Money Rules,” finance expert Jean Chatzky  says anyone under the age of 35 should aim to save 10% of what they earn. Anyone older who hasn’t saved yet should strive to save 15%. If those numbers aren’t feasible, identify what you can save — even if it’s $10 a month, and start doing it automatically.

doing it automatically.

Saving strategically

Building savings is the hallmark of financial security and is important in financial literacy, and it’s important no matter how much money you make.

Though saving can be as simple as putting money in a savings account, true financial literacy is about saving strategically, and staying current on what savings tools pay you for your business, while costing you nothing.

Search current deposit interest rates on checking, savings, money market accounts and certificates of deposit using a comparative tool like Bankrate.com, and consider only accounts that don’t require an account minimum, or charge fees to access or transfer your money.

If you’re comfortable with online banking, you’ll typically find higher rates than brick and mortar institutions offer.

Although  deposit interest rates have been paltry over the past few years, the idea is to make savings systemic, and consistent. Take advantage of automatic savings plans (also called ASPs), or automatic deduction options that an employer might offer so that a portion of each paycheck goes directly into savings, without giving you the opportunity to miss it.

Understanding fees

Banks got hit hard with regulatory legislation following the 2007 financial crisis, and they’ve got to make up for lost revenue in the form of fees.

It’s estimated that banks need to recoup, on average, between $15 and $20 a month from each depositor just to earn what they did in the past, according to an analysis on checking accounts by Oliver Wyman, a financial consulting firm.

If you’re unsure whether you’re paying fees to bank or use a credit or debit card, educate yourself by examining statements and the latest terms of your accounts online. If you’re in a product that doesn’t fit your needs, be proactive and seek one that is a better fit — before you dish out hundreds of dollars on a year on pointless fees. If you can’t find one at your current institution, a credit union may be a less expensive alternative.

You may never see an actual “bill” from a financial planner and wealth adviser, but rest assured, they don’t work for nothing. However, different advisory firms have different policies. Some get commissions from trades made on your behalf, others work on a flat- fee, and others take a percentage of the value of your portfolio, in a “ “you don’t win if I don’t win” approach.

The fee you are paying will be reflected in some shape or form on statements you receive, but it may be clear as mud. If you have no idea what you’re paying a financial adviser, ask. If you feel the value of their services is worth what you’ve paid, you’ve developed a good relationship. If you don’t, move on. The beauty of being financially literate is the power to make informed decisions.

The importance of expecting the worst

You probably know you need auto, renters, and homeowners insurance, but long-term financial planning and wealth building is highly correlated to an understanding of insurance as a risk-management tool that can protect you, your family, and your wealth for the long-term.

Familiarize yourself with the major benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of insurance, like term-life, disability, and long-term care, even if it seems like they don’t impact your life today.

Steven Knudson, financial adviser at Intermountain Financial Group, says that not having adequate life insurance is a disaster waiting to happen, and that anyone in their 50s and beyond should “obtain some level of long-term care insurance to avoid the catastrophic loss of a chronic illness in later years.”

Though employers may offer some level of insurance coverage, including for death and disability, it may not be enough to cover your survivors, and/or your assets. “Even if you have a group long term disability plan at work, pick up a personal fixed income protection in a non-cancellable disability insurance plan,” Knudson says.

Savings is largely based on preparing for the unexpected, and undesirable, aspects of life, too. Henk Pieters, certified financial planner and president of Newport Beach, Calif. based Investus Financial Planning, says that regardless of income, all clients should have at least 3-6 months worth of living expenses covered in an FDIC insured savings account — provided they have a very stable career.

Business owners and those in industries or salary tiers that present higher degrees of professional uncertainty need to save an entire year’s worth of living expenses.

Impact of tax laws

You know that taxes take a chunk out of your paycheck but the more you understand about them, the more you can leverage taxes to your advantage and increase your financial literacy.

There are many expenses that the government allows as deductions for tax reasons, including business-related travel, entertainment, and mileage. Education costs, child-care credits, mortgage fees, and expenses related to job-hunting, relocation, or a home-based business can mean paying fewer taxes, too.

Some charitable gifts and donations, including items made to qualifying non-profits, and funds that you “gift” to relatives or loved ones, whittle your tax burden too.

If you sell assets that appreciate in value, like stocks or bonds, you’ll need to pay capital gains taxes on them, but a qualified financial adviser can help dentify the best strategies to keep the most amount of money you legally can.

Use credit for good

Credit is often blamed as a reason people struggle financially, but when used as it was originally intended, it’s one of the greatest means of financial empowerment you can access and a key to financial literacy.

Building and maintaining healthy credit habits opens opportunities to borrow from lenders who can help you to build wealth, whether you choose to start a business, buy property, or invest in your future.

Amber Dixon Nominated for National Award by Peers

Amber Dixon recognized as 1 of 3 national nominees for Woman of the Year award

Salt Lake City, UT – The national office of the Women in Insurance and Financial Services (WIFS) organization asked its more than 1,000 national members to nominate one of their peers for its highest level of recognition, the Woman of the Year award. Amber Dixon, the Marketing Director for Intermountain Financial Group, LLC, and current Utah WIFS Chapter President, is one of only three nominees.

To qualify for this award, the nominee must demonstrate strong leadership within the industry, including services to WIFS and other organizations, on both national and local levels; have made a significant contribution to supporting, encouraging, and advancing other women in the insurance and financial services industry; and be a current member of WIFS for a minimum of three years.

After recognizing the strong need for a local organization built to motivate, inspire, encourage, share ideas, and mentor other women in the industry; Dixon co-founded the Utah chapter of WIFS in early 2009, with the financial support of the President/CEO of Intermountain Financial Group, the Utah agency of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual), Todd Reid, JD, CLF.

“I am delighted and honored that I was nominated for this prestigious award by my peers,” stated Dixon. “I have loved building relationships with these women, while celebrating our many successes, and working through our few disappointments. Utah WIFS has been a tremendous group to be a part of.”

Dixon has worked in the financial services industry the past 11 years with Intermountain Financial Group, under the leadership of Todd Reid, JD, CLF.

“Amber has been instrumental in our company’s community involvement, recognition, and marketing efforts on a local and national level,” Reid said. “We are proud of her for being recognized as a person who is making a difference in our company and the financial services community.”

Dixon currently serves as President of the Utah WIFS board, VP of Trustees of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO) Utah Chapter, Chair of the Workforce Development Committee (WDC) as part of the Salt Lake Chamber, and on the marketing and communications committee for the Utah Women and Education Initiative (UWEI). Dixon also served as an event judge at the International DECA Career Development Conference in 2012.

A celebration gala will be held at the WIFS National Conference in Atlanta, GA in October where Dixon will be recognized as a nominee.

To learn more about the Utah Chapter of WIFS, contact Sheila Leeds, VP of Membership, at 801-698-5110, msskyview2@msn.com, or find them on FaceBook and LinkedIn under Utah WIFS. For national information, visit http://www.wifsnational.org.

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About WIFS:

As the preeminent professional organization for women in the financial services industry, Women in Insurance & Financial Services (WIFS) is dedicated to attractingcapable women to the financialservices sector, helping them develop their talents and advancing them toward their fullest potential.They celebrated their 75th anniversary in 2011.

 

About Intermountain Financial Group:

For more than 150 years, local residents and businesses rely on Intermountain Financial Group (http://www.intermountainfinancialgroup.com) to help them secure their financial futures. The company significantly impacts Utah’s economy as seen in the numbers below (as of December, 2011):

  • More than 13,800 policyholders and clients1
  • Servicing over $740 million in assets2
  • Over $3.9 billion in life insurance coverage in      force3
  • Over $21 million of life insurance benefits      (claims) paid4
  • More than $8 million in dividends to whole life      policyholders5

 

The company has been in awarded the national Sloan When Work Works award in 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2008, as well as the Work/Life Award by the Utah Department of Workforce Services in 2011, 2010, 2008 and 2007 naming them one of Utah’s best places to work. The company currently has offices in Salt Lake City, Utah and St. George, Utah.

* * *

*Securities and investment advisory services offered through qualified registered representatives of MML Investors Services, LLC. member SIPC.  (Salt Lake City Agency – 6340 S. 3000 E., Suite 500, SLC, UT  84121 – (801) 943-6277)

MassMutual Financial Group is a marketing name for Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual) and its affiliated companies and sales representatives.

Insurance offered through MassMutual and other fine companies.

1.         An insured, owner, or payer of a MassMutual policy or contract.

2.         Includes values of MassMutual and subsidiary insurance companies’ insurance and retirement products and investment products offered through MML Investors Services, LLC, a MassMutual subsidiary.

3.         Amount of individual life insurance in force as of 12/31/11 related to products issued by Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company and its subsidiaries, C.M. Life Insurance Company and MML Bay State Life Insurance Company.

4.         Amount of individual life insurance claims paid from 1/1/11 to 12/31/11 related to products issued by Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company and its subsidiaries, C.M. Life Insurance Company and MML Bay State Life Insurance Company.

5.         The amount of dividends to whole life policyholders in 2011.

*Not practicing on behalf of MML Investors Services, LLC

Greg Williams is given Two Thumbs Up in the Salt Lake Tribune

7/27/2012 Salt Lake TribuneLearn More

The Salt Lake Tribune gave Greg Williams “Two Thumbs Up” and labeled him “a highly effective person”.
As written in the Salt Lake Tribune July 27, 2012:


What do you do when you win an award for serving your community? If you are Greg Williams, a former high school teacher who has since made a mark as a financial adviser for the Massachusetts-based MassMutual Financial Group, you direct the $10,000 prize to your old school district. The Jordan School District will use the money to expand the The Leader in Me program, modeled after Stephen Covey’s book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People to two more schools. As Covey, who died earlier this month, advised (Habit 4), everybody can win.

The New Retirement – Predictable Engagement (Financial Services Professional, Steven Knudson Interviewed)

7/15/2012 Web Talk RadioLearn More

One of Intermountain Financial Group’s Financial Services Professional’s, Steven Knudson, was interviewed on Web Talk Radio.


One key retirement goal is financial security. We get this when we have ample and reliable income and predictable expense. As long as you can manage both sides, income and expense, your retirement can become sustainable. Steve Knudson a financial adviser with thirty years of experience shares his insights on how to manage both sides of the ledger.

Listen to Podcast

Experienced Technology Specialist Joins Intermountain Financial Group, LLC

7/10/2012 Salt Lake TribuneLearn More

Utah agency hires Eric Andersen to head the technology department, supporting firm’s agents and staff.
Intermountain Financial Group, the Utah Agency of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual), has hired Eric Andersen as its Technology Specialist. Andersen will work with the firm’s financial services professionals located throughout the state with their technology needs and training.
Andersen, a graduate of Westminster College, has a strong background in the financial services industry specializing in Information Technology. He began his career at American Express where he spent 10 years in a variety of roles in Marketing, Information Technology, Human Resources, and Customer Relations. Since then, he has worked in technology related positions for several companies including ASEA, Arnold Machinery Company, Beneficial Financial Group and The MONY Group. He has also spent the past two years as the Technology Coach for The McQueen Financial Group in Salt Lake City.
“Eric joining our firm is a big win for our agency,” stated Todd Reid, JD, CLF, General Agent. “Technology is an intricate part of our planning process while working with clients and prospective clients. His background is exactly what we need to continue to assist individuals and businesses with their financial needs.”
# # #
For more than 157 years, local residents and businesses rely on Intermountain Financial Group (http://www.intermountainfinancialgroup.com) to help them secure their financial futures. The company significantly impacts Utah’s economy as seen in the numbers below (as of December, 2011): • More than 13,800 policyholders and clients1 • Servicing over $740 million in assets2 • Over $3.9 billion in life insurance coverage in force3 • Over $21 million of life insurance benefits (claims) paid4 • More than $8 million in dividends to whole life policyholders5
The company has been in awarded the national Sloan When Work Works award in 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2008, as well as the Work/Life Award by the Utah Department of Workforce Services in 2011, 2010, 2008 and 2007 naming them one of Utah’s best places to work. The company currently has offices in Salt Lake City, Utah and St. George, Utah. * * * *Securities and investment advisory services offered through qualified registered representatives of MML Investors Services, LLC. member SIPC.  (Salt Lake City Agency – 6340 S. 3000 E., Suite 500, SLC, UT  84121 – (801) 943-6277)
MassMutual Financial Group is a marketing name for Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual) and its affiliated companies and sales representatives.
Insurance offered through MassMutual and other fine companies.
1. An insured, owner, or payer of a MassMutual policy or contract. 2. Includes values of MassMutual and subsidiary insurance companies’ insurance and retirement products and investment products offered through MML Investors Services, LLC, a MassMutual subsidiary. 3. Amount of individual life insurance in force as of 12/31/11 related to products issued by Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company and its subsidiaries, C.M. Life Insurance Company and MML Bay State Life Insurance Company. 4. Amount of individual life insurance claims paid from 1/1/11 to 12/31/11 related to products issued by Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company and its subsidiaries, C.M. Life Insurance Company and MML Bay State Life Insurance Company. 5. The amount of dividends to whole life policyholders in 2011.

The Ten Commandments of Selecting a Mutual Fund as a 401k Option

By Christopher Carosa, CTFA | April 4, 2012

(This is the second installment of a special three-part series)

While the four steps to a well-documented 401k investment due diligence process just fell in our laps, getting into the nitty-gritty of the first two steps – the identifying the selection and monitoring processes – might prove a tad bit morelaborious. There’s another thing about this particular portion of the due diligence process you must be warned about. It’s the part where the arguments start.

If you take any two investment advisers and ask them which specific characteristics one should focus on when selecting a mutual fund to be included among a 401k plan’s investment options, you’re likely to get vastly different answers. Fortunately, in speaking to different advisers, we’ve been able to whittle down their recommendations to very broad areas – wide enough for most advisers to swim comfortably within. So, if you’re looking for a fight, you won’t find one here.

I.        Company’s Custom Statistics – It all starts here, with specific data pertaining to the company’s demographics. This data set will produce the major criteria 401k plan sponsors – or their advisers – will later use when determining appropriate fund options. Todd Reid, General Agent for Intermountain Financial Group in Salt Lake City, Utah says this will indicate the “time horizon, liquidity, and true risk tolerance” of the plan’s investors; hence, act as a great starting point towards selecting funds. II.      Company’s Goal-Oriented Target Analysis – While company demographics are generic, it’s important to recognize that even employees of the same age may have difference return requirements. In order to best select relevant funds for the plan option, it’s critical to know the range of target returns. This will come in handy during the later performance analysis of each candidate fund. III.    Key Characteristics of the Fund – Before even getting into performance and costs, it’s important to identify a set of key differentiators you’ll review among all funds, whatever the investment objective. Boyd Wagstaff, 401k and Qualified Plan Specialist for Intermountain Financial Group, likes to focus in on the fund managers. He looks at years of tenure and style. “We want to make sure that fund or investment is true to its value,” he says. “For example, if we are looking for a large-cap value stock, we want to make sure it does not change to some other style, but that it remains consistent with its original design.” IV.     Peer Group Performance – Manny Schiffres, Executive Editor, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance in Washington, D.C. says, “We look at performance, specifically the consistency of performance. How has a fund done year by year against its peer group and an appropriate benchmark is far more important than cumulative results, which can be swayed by one outstanding year.” V.       Rolling Long-Term Performance – This approach to performance measurement is more consistent with the results of studies in behavioral finance as it dodges the dangers of short-term volatility and avoids the “snapshot-in-time” phenomenon Schiffres refers to. He says, “Analysis of the sort that says this or that fund has beaten its peers or an index over the past 1, 3, 5 and 10 years is bogus. As mentioned earlier, one outstanding (or awful) year totally distorts the numbers. Plus, because this sort of analysis can change depending on whether a fund is strong at the beginning or the end of the period, even if the results are essentially the same in either case, it is obviously a flawed approach to analyzing performance.” VI.     Generic Fund Statistics – All funds share common traits. Some of them may reveal characteristics the plan sponsor will want to shun or emphasize. Among these can include the number of holdings (addressed previously in “Overdiversification and the 401k Investor – Too Many Stocks Spoil the Portfolio”), the concentration of holdings, the fund’s size and any unique costs associated with the fund. When it comes to a fund’s size, Schiffres says “The bigger the fund, the harder it is to manage. This is especially true when the fund focuses on less-liquid investments, stuff other than big-cap stocks and Treasury bonds. When you buy in big quantities, you tend to force up the price of the security you’re buying. When you dump large quantities, you help push down the price. Neither is helpful to the manager.” Regarding costs, besides the usual expense ratio, Reid also looks at the “sales charge in relation to the fund class, and available break points purchased. The different fund fees vary by Class A, B, and C. Some classes have front-end fees, while others do not. Service fees are also a piece of the fees needing to be considered and vary by manager, and length of deferred sales charge.” VII.   Proprietary written description of Fund’s Investment Objective – These next four Commandments have one thing in common. They all rely on written documentation beyond the fund’s prospectus. While plan sponsors must read the prospectus, they must also remember the prospectus is inherently a sales tool. Getting a third party’s opinion can often help the plan elude the seemingly attractive pitch of an inappropriate fund. Sometimes this third party view comes from an adviser, sometimes it comes from a publisher. Ideally, it will be proprietary in nature, aimed at the specific needs of the plan and not for the general mass market. The first detail the 401k plan sponsor will want to see is an objective description of the fund’s investment objective. That’s the basis of each of the next three items. VIII. Proprietary written analysis of Fund’s ability to meet its objective – Did the fund meet its objective? Plan sponsors should not count on the fund to tell them. Select an unbiased party. Reid uses these sources to “review the history, performance of sector, and scrutinize any drifting that may have occurred.” He says, “It is my duty to my clients to ensure them the funds stay true to their sector and that the allocations are relevant.” IX.    Proprietary written commentary on Fund management – According to Schiffres, “the manager is the person responsible for the record.” He matter-of-factly says “past performance is not guaranteed. Expenses pretty much are baked into the cake. In other words, expenses are something you know in advance, so you want to keep them as low as possible. Of course, super-low expenses are the main justification for going with index funds. To recommend actively managed funds, you have to feel confident that you can identify managers you think are good enough to overcome their expense disadvantage.” X.      Proprietary written recommendation of relative appropriateness – When all is said and done, a plan sponsor must always ask “Is it time to replace this fund?” Here it’s vitally important to have a wide variety of choice, since any limitations may expose the plan sponsor to greater fiduciary liability. Wagstaff says, “We use a variety of sources to compare and contrast. We use third-party resources and we look for balance. We don’t want to load the platform up with one type of fund. We prefer a large number of funds to cherry pick and collect a platform for our clients that we believe is cost appropriate, diversified, and with excellent returns.”

We trust this represents a Decalogue possessing both credence and compatibility. Not only does it make sense to use, but the vast majority of plan sponsors can easily adopt each category of scrutiny.

We end this series next with a summation of the ideal 401k investment due diligence process.

Part I: 4 Easy Steps 401k Plan Sponsors Can Take to Insure a Well-Documented Investment Due Diligence Process Part II: The Ten Commandments of Selecting a Mutual Fund as a 401k Option Part III: 10 Point Checklist for the Ideal 401k Investment Due Diligence Process

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Christopher Carosa, CTFA

Utah Financial Services Agency Spreading the Word to Utah Consumers with Heart Conditions

MassMutual reaffirms commitment to make life insurance more broadly available to persons with heart conditions

Salt Lake City – Up to date diagnostic and treatment advances are resulting in broader life insurance coverage for many people with cardiovascular conditions. Conditions such as coronary artery, valvular and congenital heart diseases are being regularly reviewed by Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual), a move that helps more people protect their families financially despite wrestling with the serious illness.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States – resulting in nearly 30 percent of all deaths – and is a major cause of disability1. The death rate from cardiovascular disease declined by nearly 28% from 1997 to 2007,”  according to Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics in the 2011 Update to the medical journal” Circulation.”

“Many people in our area with medical conditions related to heart disease may now be eligible for life insurance,” said Todd Reid, General Agent.  “MassMutual underwriters look at a ‘whole’ person and provide incentives for people to live healthier lifestyles via ‘credits’ to reduce premiums, such as not smoking, managing cholesterol and blood pressure, and maintaining a healthy weight.”

Last year, MassMutual updated underwriting guidelines for valvular and congenital heart disease. The company, over the last two years, has also updated its life insurance underwriting guidelines for persons suffering from diabetes as well as various forms of cancer – breast, prostate and kidney.

“People should not assume they cannot get coverage because of past medical conditions,” said Todd Reid, General Agent. “We encourage them to speak to your trusted financial professional.”

To learn more, visit Intermountain Financial Group’s website at http//www.intermountainfinancialgroup.com and massmutual.com, or call 801-943-6277 to contact a financial services professional.

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About the Local Agency:

For more than 157 years, local residents and businesses rely on Intermountain Financial Group (http://www.intermountainfinancialgroup.com) to help them secure their financial futures. The company significantly impacts Utah’s economy as seen in the numbers below (as of December, 2010):

  • More than 14,000 policyholders and clients1
  • Servicing over $711 million in assets2
  • Over $3.9 billion in life insurance coverage in force3
  • Over $28 million of life insurance benefits (claims) paid4
  • More than $8 million in dividends to whole life policyholders5

The company has been in awarded the national Sloan When Work Works award in 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2008, as well as the Work/Life Award by the Utah Department of Workforce Services in 2011, 2010, 2008 and 2007 naming them one of Utah’s best places to work. The company currently has offices in Salt Lake City, Utah and St. George, Utah.

* * *

*Securities and investment advisory services offered through qualified registered representatives of MML Investors Services, LLC. member SIPC.  (Salt Lake City Agency – 6340 S. 3000 E., Suite 500, SLC, UT  84121 – (801) 943-6277)

MassMutual Financial Group is a marketing name for Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual) and its affiliated companies and sales representatives.

Insurance offered through MassMutual and other fine companies.

1.            An insured, owner, or payer of a MassMutual policy or contract.

2.            Includes values of MassMutual and subsidiary insurance companies’ insurance and retirement products and investment products offered through MML Investors Services, LLC, a MassMutual subsidiary.

3.            Amount of individual life insurance in force as of 12/31/10 related to products issued by Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company and its subsidiaries, C.M. Life Insurance Company and MML Bay State Life Insurance Company.

4.            Amount of individual life insurance claims paid from 1/1/10 to 12/31/10 related to products issued by Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company and its subsidiaries, C.M. Life Insurance Company and MML Bay State Life Insurance Company.

5.            The amount of dividends to whole life policyholders in 2010.

About MassMutual

Founded in 1851, MassMutual is a leading mutual life insurance company that is run for the benefit of its members and participating policyholders. The company has a long history of financial strength and strong performance, and although dividends are not guaranteed, MassMutual has paid dividends to eligible participating policyholders every year since the 1860s. With whole life insurance as its foundation, MassMutual provides products to help meet the financial needs of clients, such as life insurance, disability income insurance, long term care insurance, retirement/401(k) plan services, and annuities. In addition, the company’s strong and growing network of financial professionals helps clients make good financial decisions for the long-term.

MassMutual Financial Group is a marketing name for Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual) and its affiliated companies and sales representatives. MassMutual is headquartered in Springfield, Massachusetts and its major affiliates include: Babson Capital Management LLC; Baring Asset Management Limited; Cornerstone Real Estate Advisers LLC; The First Mercantile Trust Company; MassMutual International LLC; MML Investors Services, LLC, Member FINRA and SIPC; OppenheimerFunds, Inc.; and The MassMutual Trust Company, FSB.

CRN201401-156485

1Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics – 2010 Update.  A report from the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee.